gumpel

Joining the century

Matthew Uebbing posts pages from his sketchbooks on Tumblr. They’re always beautiful, sometimes funny, erotic, and scary. I’m lucky enough to own his painting Masback

My sister just gave birth to her first baby two weeks ago. This is my second nephew but a reminder of the terror/joy. I came across this photograph while working for 20x200 and immediately fell in love with it. It’s Eugene Richards, called After the Birth. It reminds me of Bernini’s Ecstasy of Saint Teresa. See more of his work on his website.
Eugene Richards

My sister just gave birth to her first baby two weeks ago. This is my second nephew but a reminder of the terror/joy. I came across this photograph while working for 20x200 and immediately fell in love with it. It’s Eugene Richards, called After the Birth. It reminds me of Bernini’s Ecstasy of Saint Teresa. See more of his work on his website.


Eugene Richards

Robert Lansdenfrom two series: Nothing To See Nothing To Hide and Equanimity. 

hyperallergic:

The New Casualists Strike Again

Sarah Faux, “Crawling Man” (2012). Oil and spray paint on canvas, 42 x 38 inches (all images…

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hyperallergic:

The New Casualists Strike Again

Sarah Faux, “Crawling Man” (2012). Oil and spray paint on canvas, 42 x 38 inches (all images…

View Post

(via kyanderson)

I’ve loved these for years, never knew they were part of a series called Pie Fight Study… making me love them even more. 

See more of Adrian Ghenie’s work here

Currently reading Five Points, this map is a great addition to my nighttime reading. 
This map, sent to me by friend/roommate Alexis, looks at the distribution of nationalities in New York City in 1890. More texture = more diversity, less texture = less diversity. The map seems to have been first discussed here so check it out if you want the facts behind this beautiful quilt work of census data. 

Currently reading Five Points, this map is a great addition to my nighttime reading. 

This map, sent to me by friend/roommate Alexis, looks at the distribution of nationalities in New York City in 1890. More texture = more diversity, less texture = less diversity. The map seems to have been first discussed here so check it out if you want the facts behind this beautiful quilt work of census data.